YAY! Finished! Finally! See dragon Tripodd in all his clumsy glory!

Here he comes, Faunia´s eager school-dragon, ready for a new day.

Wouldn´t you like your children to have such a friendly and enthusiastic “teacher´s pet” in the classroom? 😉

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(pics by Th. Schramm)

 

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38 thoughts on “YAY! Finished! Finally! See dragon Tripodd in all his clumsy glory!

    • 😉 Hi Stephen, thanks for your feedback, so glad you like my little clumsy Dragon. But nooo – Tripodd is not related to the very cute Soup Dragon (thanks for the info and link! loved it!!) but a distant cousin of Faunia´s waterdragon Dougal – and I cannot wait to bring all of them to “life” in some animated way.

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        • … oh yes that sounds great, at least in my head I already have a complete animated 90-minute-film of Faunia with all its creatures great and small ;-D

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        • 😉 yes indeed, but gimme just a little more time, there still are some bits of the storyline to be completed and some sketches of the most funniest scenes to be made – and thats excactly what I am doing these days and loving every minute 😉 You like these animated funny stories and characters, how do you find Wallace&Gromit or the Creature Comfort stories?Do you have favourites?

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        • I like both.
          In Creature Comforts he use of real voices with animation of animal characters is very clever.
          I think it’s the innocence of these cartoons that I like, I get fed up with innuendo after innuendo in some animation work for children as they try to entertain adults too.
          .

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        • yes I agree, and I personally just LOVE the humour of Creature Comfort and Wallace&Gromit – as well as the vivid imagination + attention to detail f.i. for the crazy machines and inventions of W&G, that is just soo fantastic. In my animated Faunia film I promise there will be no innuendo after innuendo – some characters will not speak much anyway or at all 😉

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        • yes I totally agree, sounds like your inner child is wide awake, I like that a lot ;-)) – just think of Gromit rising his one eyebrow or shaking his head in sorrow when Wallace is saying embarassing things…after our talk yesterday I had to watch “The Curse of the Were-Rabbit” 😉 Do you also like puppets like the Muppets or such as “The Labyrinth” ? Gosh I am 45 but watching stuff like that makes me feel like a happy 10 year old ;-))

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        • I have to be in the right mood for such things – the Muppet Treasure Island and Christmas are family favourites.
          I’ve just been watching a bit of ‘Coraline’ – not something I’ve seen before, but I plan to catch the rest of it some time. (I don’t think age has anything to do with these things except insofar that if you didn’t develop a love of these things when you were young I doubt you ever would!)

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        • oh yes, that is true with being in the right mood for some of those shows/characters. Coraline sounds interesting, stop motion does have a very special charm anyway, in that area I really prefer the funny ones, Tim Burton f.i. somehow is not for me with films like “The corpse´s Bride” although I know there are a lot of people who love it and it sure was very successful. Yes I think if you keep your inner child awake it keeps you young at heart and it is THE ULTIMATE BASE for creativity!! 😉 Being truely creative means to “seriously” play, I absolutely believe in that, and read some really inspiring books about that f.i. form Julia Cameron. What about Photography, do you think it is important to have a light and playful attitude sometime when catching a situation or view and not focussing completely on technical perfection?

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        • 🙂 – go with the flow, expect the unexpected, adapt, stop and look – are my main tactics when I’m out and about. And when I’m at home or without the camera, input input input. I like to try things, if not for good outcomes there and then but building up knowledge/experience when I’m out. For me, still life tends to be too time consuming, though I do like to play and experiment and try to replicate/extend photos I see – http://stephenhip.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/silver-water/
          Ultimately, I’m a photographer, not an artist – I can photograph what there is – I’m not very good with creating the ‘is’ 😉

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        • …now, my DEAREST Yorkshire lad, how can you not be an artist and not being good with creating the “is”? You just linked me to the proof. Tssss, always this British understatement ;-)) I definetly think photography is art, but I do agree that really”forcefully” putting a scene or set together is patience testing, I for myself as a pure amateur photographer find it astounding how you pro photographers have the patience to make use of all those diff. lenses , exposure times etc That is something I could not! I have a “regular” little digi cam and avoid any kind of mucking around with strange setting adjustments. I´d rather sculpt more dragons ;-D

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        • mmmm… now you’ve opened a can of worms.

          Fundamentally, it depends on your definition of art.
          For me, ‘photography’ is photography (see later), separate to ‘Art’, though it may have ‘artistic’ tendencies as ‘art’ may have ‘photographic’ tendencies (have you seen those paintings that are made to look like photographs?). I also have to acknowledge that most ‘photographers’ consider themselves as ‘artists’.

          Photography is a craft, much as carpentry, or masonry, I guess I would include painting, drawing and pottery in this. Photography is, essentially, a mechanical process. It is not standard to create art with a camera, but it is possible to record art with a camera, which doesn’t make the resulting photograph art, but a photograph of art.
          If we have a camera what could you or I create with it – nothing if it doesn’t exist in front of the camera. If I give you a piece of paper and a pencil what could be created……it is probably the most powerful medium of creation we have.

          (I would also explain that I believe ‘Photography’ the process of using film/paper/chemicals is distinct from ‘digital art’ the use of digital sensors/ computers/programs.)
          You can create something from a ball of clay, I can only ever record it.
          I don’t think being able to record something I see makes me an ‘artist’, but I would except the title ‘craftsman’.
          Art based on photographs can exist – where something ‘imagined’ is created from multiple photographs (e.g. collage) – and digital images (initially from digital cameras) can create digital art – collage.

          🙂 – I am also coming round to the idea that for something to be Art it has to be unique – from the digital imaging side of my work, I can create as many copies as I like.

          🙂 – I am no ‘pro’ photographer, but thank you for the compliment! All the ‘technicals’ are simply part of the craft.

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        • ;-)oh yes I knew my comment would lead to discussion, and I can follow your reasoning quite well. I agree onthecraft-part, but think some crafts can be seen as art. And I agree that to define “art” is not simple anyway as it really depends on the indvidual´s point of view what she/he considers as art. You say one can record art with a camera which does not make the resulting pcture a Piece of art but a photo of art, here I think that really depends in what way the photo is taken . If you take a black and white photograph of a simple object and use certain camera settings to enhance lighting etc – for me (if I “like” it) that would make the resulting photograph a piece of art and not the object of which the photo was taken. The recording – if one is able to record something with a camera in a way that is “heartmoving” somehow, catching the right angle and light etc I see it as art ;-). Art has to be unique to be art? Hmm there I see another can of worms open 😉 … what is unique? sometimes I think nowadays “everything” has been done/written/painted/crafted/photographed by someone before, although there is the personal touch that unmistakingly makes it unique if it somehow visible on the piece of art. And some see and appreciate / acknowledge this personal touch, some don´t. The picture you linked me to – for me that is art and when you produced it, in my opinion you were an artist 😉

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        • 🙂 – when I say unique I refer to each work. If you were to make a mould of one of your pieces and cast it many times, the original would be the ‘art’ the others just reproductions. Unfortunately, this distinction is not particularly relevant in digital imaging, I can make as many prints as I like (all being identical) and as many copies of the original data file I wanted. I have seen all kinds of ‘limited edition’ labels, as if this adds some sort of value to the print, when in fact it’s really an statement of integrity. If you were to accidently damage one of your pieces….. I can just print another of mine.

          It might be argued that photographs using the ‘wet process’ are unique, as each has to be done separately, but a skilled worker can get pretty close each time – much in the way a stone mason can replicate work.
          Digital imaging is the only thing I can think of where the output can be reviewed at every stage using the go back button, or saving individual copies of the data file. (I suspect you would like to have that as an option as you progress each of your works?.)

          And if somebody were to put their camera on ‘auto everything’ they will be able to produce perfectly fine photos – the media is automated, I’m not sure that putting a camera on manual changes a snapper to an artist. Nor do I think, because I see something to photograph, makes the output art.
          For you to moved by anything requires you as the viewer to have the insight, not me the photographer – many times people have commented that a particular of my images means something to them, when the idea hadn’t crossed my mind.
          As to personal touch, i.e. you can recognise the work of a photographer/artist when you see their work, I call this style – it is something most of us strive for in our work.

          🙂 – the link I gave you took you to what I consider simply a technical exercise. I had seen something similar (as with most people I feed off everything I see). The picture had no explanation and, as somebody that way inclined, I was intrigued to see if I could reproduce it in some way. It probably took me about 30 hours overall – I impose strict constraints on cost in my photography, so scraps of wood, gaffer tape, a clothes horse, fish tank and A1 blue card all helped produce the image. (and clothes pegs). (Photography is about deception – another contentious discussion in there too!)

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        • I absolutely agree – art and photography (and moving images) definetly are about deception and escapism.
          Concerning uniqueness – I personally would call the reproduction of a piece of art still a piece of art. Uniqueness for me means that is an created or crafted object which is absolutely different from what I have seen or thought of before. Which of course does not automatically makes it a piece of art for me. To call it art, I need to feel touched deeply – in a sense of harmony, humour, get reminded of happy moments f.i. from childhood, fascination and excitement because it is exotic or strange or even scary in some way.
          😉 Of course you can call your “products” as you like, technical exercise or art or simply a photograph, and of course the viewer will have her/his personal idea and Feelings about and “name” for it, and I think it best when “the producer” keeps her/himself a bit tonguetied when talking about what they “meant” or “felt” or “wanted to convey” when producing their output. The viewer should be free to feel and interpret how she/he likes when looking at the piece. It sometimes gets a bit amusing when some masterpieces of longdead artists are discussed “oh Rembrandt felt this and that when he painted this ..” – how the hell do you know? But some might wrinkle their forehead in a serious artsy expression, mumbling some understanding words “ah yes now that clears everything up for me I do understand his work now..”…ah well if they enjoy it … 😉 By the way, I would not call myself an artist either but simply a creaturemaker, producing (hopefully) some unique (in my sense of uniqueness) creatures / characters by using my personal style. And not focussing if the endproduct is called a piece of art or a “thing” or whatever, I call it by its “species” and the name it was given by me ;-D
          I think in character-/creaturedesign the uniqueness (in my sense of uniqueness) might be easier to achieve than maybe in other crafts / arts, maybe in all crafts where you use your hands on material that is “lively” like clay/paint/stone . And yes, you are right with me sometimes wanting a “go back button” but up to a certain point when working with the materials I use there is the possibility to undo things (except soapstone – what´s gone is gone!) … but all in all I mainly enjoy the process of creating, not focussing in a perfectionist attitude on how the endproduct should look like, I have an idea what I want as the outcome but not a 100% fixed picture in my head.

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        • Of course, not being able to ‘undo’ is part of the learning process and will inevitably make a thing more organic – the ability to adapt is a valuable attribute – I’m not adverse to turning a shot, intended as colour, into black and white to lose a distracting splurge of colour.
          (I also think there’s a lot of pretentious claptrap associated with the ‘art world’ – as you say, if you like it as art, then who am I (or anyone else) to tell you different – and if you think something is utter hogwash while those around you rave about it….. tough! 😉

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        • Yes, sometimes colour really distracts, that´s true. Black and white photography can be very very atmospheric. I have no experience in it but really admire it. I was “in discussion with myself” today as well concerning colour or no colour. I am skindeep in sketching with ink which I haven´t done for a while. I played around with black ink sketches with no colouring, black ink sketches coloured boldly, but both somehow felt / looked not right for my Faunia sketches … so I think I will stick to very thin lines in brown ink to sketch some scenes of the story, and colour the characters in a VERY subtle way with just a hint of watercolour… very old fashioned style, actually, but I like it 😉 and I think it will match the rural atmosphere of my little fantasy community. Now here it really is impossible to undo “mistakes” – one simply has to start from the beginning with a new sketch … and that sometimes can be a bit frustrating when you got a facial expression or movement just right but messed up some other part, so its´s practice practice practice ;-).
          You know, when I look at your lovely Yorkshire landscape and nature photographs, I really feel inspired to draw / sketch some of the views you caught in just that “old fashioned” technique I mentioned, that would be so “right” for that wonderful area . Do you sometimes come across painters who have put up their painting gear right there in nature to work?

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        • oh yes, that looks like he is really taking it seriously 😉 I admire the patience one must have to put up one´s gear and then sketch/paint right on the spot, I think I would take photographs and then do the sketching/painting at home.
          But what I really love is to take photographs on horseback when horsetrekking, have you ever tried that?;-))
          For me, that is one of the most enjoyable ways to “travel” in nature with animals I really love that carry you through lush forests and up very steep hills with great views 😉 I have plenty of photos with the typical horse ears in the picture. In one riding area to where I went quite often, we also did some real entertaining little “stunt videos” with our cameras – cantering along in a group and filming those who filmed us when overtaking us, now that was a lot of fun ;-). The UK also has wonderful areas for horseriding, I went to Wales and LOVED it, it was just like the Shire. For lunch we bound the horses to some trees and went in some real rustic pubs … oh I need a holiday ;-D

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        • My bicycle is my favourite mode of transport other than walking.
          The UK does have some wonderful areas for horse riding, but you have to get there. There are stables are around here but the openness of the countryside is not conducive, in my mind – to my style of photography ie see a track, walk away from whenever permissible/safe. With my bike, I can cycle along a road and pick country bridleway to trundle down. If I want, I can shove my bike in the back of the car, drive somewhere and start exploring a new area.
          If horses are your thing, that’s great, they make a fine platform to explore from.

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        • yes the “getting to” those remote but lovely horsetrekking places is sometimes quite adventurous,thats true. But so far I always found it worth it beause there is – for me – no better way to forget sorrow and trouble when on a horse in nature (beside the accompanying photo-and film-fun). Have you been around the UK a bit, are there areas you especially find inspiring and beautiful?

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        • I’ve only been to Scotland once, Wales a few times, but most of England. To be honest, I’m happiest when I’m exploring, but that doesn’t mean in the grand sense. Only Sunday afternoon I was out on my bike, and saw a bridleway sign that I happened upon when I dodged across the road to look at a derelict house. I followed it, not knowing where it would take me or what I would see – I found a new area of potential from a natural world point of view, e.g. irises where growing around overgrown drainage ponds. The thicket on both sides of the bridleway opened out into gently rolling farmland. The air was quite still, the sun shining, the skylarks singing, the barley just turning. I’ve no doubt that dozens of people had used the route, on foot, bike, horse or car – turns out a few country houses had it for their driveway – but it was new to me.
          I’m lucky, because of my wide interest base, when I’m away from home, particularly when I’m on my own, I have no trouble forgetting everything else and finding inspiration, beauty, mystery and something to challenge my mind.

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        • ah that sounds wonderful and you not only take great photograhs, you also have a very catching visual way of describing what you saw 😉 … makes me want to pack my backpack immediately and rush out to go trekking/travelling/tramping. Oh Scotland must be phantastic I have not been there so far though I´ve been to Ireland many years ago – beautiful! In England I am very tempted to see the New Forest and the Lakedistrict, I have been to Wiltshire which I liked a lot, to Oxford and Eton. Here in Germany I find the Elb Sandstone mountains very very interesting and will try to go there on a tramping trip soon. Yes being out alone in nature and just absorbing + exploring is wonderful, I for instance enjoy that a lot on my regular early-Saturday-morning dog walkies, it´s quiet and just nature and rabbits-pheasants-sheep-horses-deer around 😉 and I keep finding new paths as well. I agree one does not have to travel that far to find exciting views, although I do enjoy it every few years (if I can afford it) to really be in another world for a bit and travel real far. Lately I have a very strong urge to get out of town a bit more regularly and might go to Groningen this weekend, a lovely dutch town with a nice atmosphere and gorgeous old buildings and not that far away. But I also will be in Cologne on Wednesday and sure will take my camera with me. Hopefully I find time this week to put up another blogpost on my moulding and casting topic…but ´ll see how the week develops and go with the flow 😉

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        • I suspect the areas you mention are ‘dripping in history’. I have found reading books on local history rewarding – they give me an added layer to my mental model of the area – especially those written by Victorians.

          as to ‘go with the flow’ – is there any other way to go? 😉
          (Of course, the best thing to do on these trips out is relax!)

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        • yes a bit of history is involved, that´s true, I am one of those “maniac” tourists who explore and go sightseeing almost to the point of sheer exhaustion 😉 … going with the flow + relax sure is the best approach , from time to time I succeed in following that concept when I am out and about

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        • oh dear 😉 . On holiday it might be really good to “do nothing” to recharge your batteries …I guess it really depends in what state of stress/strain one is. I guess as a photographer you always have “enough to do” wherever you are as long as you have your camera with you?

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        • …hmmm I clearly remember you saying something about having a wide interestbase and enjoying to try new things 😉 – holidays are perfect to try out new kinds of sports, crafts, or/and local foods …or do a photo series on seabrids, waves, sand structures, boats, build castles from sand (with sanddragons that conquer the westfold! ) …enough suggestions? 😉

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  1. This is so cute and kids will love it, such a friendly face and it’s great to have a really in depth back story to the characters you make, this really comes through in the final piece 🙂

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    • Hehe I happen to know that fortunately also some “old” kids like him as well, and I SO much want him to move, we seriously have to talk about the animation help we talked about some time ago 😉

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